Pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

Guy Jacoby, Instructor of the PNMR experiment

Room 005, Nano Center guyjacob@post.tau.ac.il    03-6405709

 

 

Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Topics of the experiment
  3. How to prepare for the experiment?
  4. The experimental schedule
  5. Literature
  6. Links

 

 

 

Introduction

Since the first successful detection of nuclear resonance signals late in 1945, nuclear magnetism has developed at a pace that shows no sign of slackening. Besides its first and obvious application to the measurement of nuclear moments, it has become a major tool in the study of the finer properties of matter in bulk. Structure of molecules, internal motion in solids and liquids, electronic densities in metals alloys and semiconductors, density of states in superconductors, and properties of quantum liquids are some of the topics where nuclear magnetism has so far provided specific and detailed information. The most known application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is of imaging of biological tissues, which is nowadays the preferred diagnostic tool in many clinical cases.

 

 

Topics of the experiment

  • Nuclear spin and magnetic moment.
  • Nuclear magnetic resonance.
  • Measurement of the gyromagnetic ratio of the proton.
  • Measurement of the relaxation times T1,T2 and T2* in CuSo4 solutions.
  • The dependence of the relaxation times on the solution concentration.

 

 

How to prepare for the experiment?

  1. Read the PNMR experiment instructions.
  2. Read the relevant literature: 

1.      Kittel, Introduction to Solid State Physics, 6th edition, 463-473.

2.      R. L. Dixon and K. E. Ekstrand, The physics of proton NMR.

3.      J. P. Hornak, The basics of NMR, chapters 3-4,6.

4.      E. R. Andrew, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, chapters 2.1-2.3, 2.7, 5.2-5.5.

  1. Learn the experiment's schedule.
  2. Make sure you understand the experimental technique.
  3. Answer the preparation questions (in the experiment's instructions).

 

 

 

 

 

The experimental schedule

  1. Written exam - Approximately one hour.
  2. Learning the experimental apparatus (introduction, the instrument, getting started, experiments, specifications).
  3. Learning the interface to the computer.
  4. Measuring the proton gyromagnetic constant.
  5. Qualitative measurement of the different relaxation times for one solution.
  6. Quantitative measurement of the proton gyromagnetic constant and the different relaxation times for all the solutions.

 

 

Literature

1.      Kittel, Introduction to Solid State Physics, 6th edition, 463-473.

2.      R. L. Dixon and K. E. Ekstrand, The physics of proton NMR.

3.      J. P. Hornak, The basics of NMR, chapters 3-4,6.

4.      E. R. Andrew, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, chapters 2.1-2.3, 2.7, 5.2-5.5.

5.      M. H. Levitt, Spin dynamics: basics of nuclear magnetic resonance, Chichester, New York, John Wiley & Sons, 2001.

6.      E. L. Hahn, Free nuclear induction, Physics Today, Nov. 1953, 4.

7.      E. L. Hahn, Spin echoes, Phys. Rev. 80, 580, 1950.

8.      H. Y. Carr and E. M. Purcell, Effects of diffusion on free precession in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, Phys. Rev. 94, 630, 1954.

9.      S. Meiboom and D. Gill, Modified spin-echo method for measuring nuclear relaxation times, Rev. Sci. Inst. 29, 688, 1958.

10.  J. H. Simpson and H. Y. Carr, Diffusion and nuclear spin relaxation in water, Phys. Rev. 111, 1201, 1958.

11.  C. P. Slichter, Principles of magnetic resonance, 3rd enlarged Ed., Berlin, Springer-Verlag, 1990.

  1. Foley, I., Farooqui, S. & Kleinberg, R. Effect of Paramagnetic Ions on NMR Relaxation of Fluids at Solid Surfaces. J. Magn. Reson. A 123, 95–104 (1996).

 

 

Links

  1. J. P. Hornak, The basics of MRI.
  2. Teachspin (the apparatus manufacturer) website.

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