The Munitz laboratory

Our laboratory is focused on elucidating cellular and molecular mechanisms that are involved in mucosal inflammation. Specifically, we are interested in the roles of immune inhibitory receptors in the lung and gastrointestinal tract especially in type-2-associated and innate immune responses.

 
 

Mucosal immunology is a broad term describing the interactions that occur in internal organ surfaces that are exposed to the outer world. As such, the gastrointestinal-, respiratory- and urogenital-tracts are primary entry points of numerous antigens and pathogens that upon entry can be a major cause of disease.
The goal of the research is to identify novel pharmaceutical targets for the treatment of patients with asthma or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To achieve this goal we examine the responses of various gene targeted mice (including transgenic and knockout mice) to various disease protocols including: experimental asthma, experimental colitis and inflammation induced cancer.

 

The gastrointestinal-, respiratory- and urogenital-tracts are primary entry points of numerous pathogens and antigens. Therefore, complex immunological mechanisms evolved to efficiently and potently respond to such antigens. Notably, exaggerated immune responses such as those observed in asthma and inflammatory bowel disease are often harmful and may lead to substantial morbidity. Therefore, we study the biology and mechanism of immune inhibitory receptors in these mucosal sites.

Our goal: To identify novel immunological mechanisms that can be pharmacologically targeted in diseases affecting the lung and gastrointestinal tract.

To achieve this goal we use a combination of state-of-the art in-vivo and in-vitro approaches combining genomics, proteomics, molecular biology and biochemistry.