Volume 23 Number 2 1996


Contents:


Wild Olive (Olea europaea) Stones from a Chalcolithic Cave at Shoham, Israel and their Implications
   Nili Liphschitz, Ram Gophna, Georges Bonani
   and Amir Feldstein

The Ashkelon Trough Settlements in the Early Bronze Age I: New Evidence of Maritime Trade
   Ram Gophna and Nili Liphschitz

Elite Emulation and Egyptian Governance in Ramesside Canaan
   Carolyn Higginbotham

The Stratigraphy and Chronology of Megiddo and Beth-shan in the 12th - 11th Centuries B.C.E
   Israel Finkelstein

A New Approach to Levels VI-V at Tel Beth-shan
   Eli Yannai

A Linear A Inscription from Tel Lachish (Lach ZA 1) with Appendix by Yoram Eshet, Micropaleontological Examination of a Chalky bowl from Lachish
   Margalit Finkelberg, Alexander Uchitel
   and David Ussishkin

The Date of a Bronze Vase from Tell en-Nasbeh
   Jeffrey R. Zorn

Two Ceramic Assemblages from Hellenistic Apollonia
   Moshe Fischer and Oren Tal

A Salvage Excavation at Herzliya Beth
   Oren Tal

Wild Olive (Olea europaea) Stones from a Chalcolithic Cave at Shoham, Israel and their Implications


Nili Liphschitz, Ram Gophna, Georges Bonani and Amir Feldstein

The question of the earliest period when domesticated olives might have existed in Ancient Israel was reconsidered through an examination of botanical and archaeological remains from ancient times (Liphschitz, et al. 1991). The botanical finds gathered from archaeological excavations included three components: pollen grains, stones and wood remains. Careful examination was made on recent reference material i.e. pollen grains, stones and wood samples collected from wild and cultivated specimens all over the Mediterranean region of Israel. Results of the research show that it is impossible to distinguish between wild and cultivated olives, and cannot, therefore, contribute to the debate concerning the onset of olive cultivation.



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